Five Tips to Improve Your Writing

I work with many artists and entrepreneurs who are continually honing their unique voices. From my friends scribing their own screenplays to my clients crafting copy for their websites, I get a lot of requests for tips on writing and copy editing. Drafting a novel requires a different approach from crafting an actor bio, but the basic balancing act of finding words that intrigue your reader, communicate your message and actually sound authentic to you, remains the same. Read on...


The #1 Common Factor in Every Successful Audition and How to Achieve It

Auditioning always feels high-stakes. Whether it’s your shot to book a big role or gain acceptance into your dream university, walking into an audition always brings a lot of anxiety, excitement and nerves. From working as a casting assistant and an actor, I can tell you that there is one common factor among every successful audition I have ever seen: a centered actor. Read on...


Five Tips for Making Your Own Work

Dynamic, juicy dream roles can be few and far between for most actors but they don’t necessarily need to be. With a huge, whopping thanks to Youtube, Netlfix and the rise of new media, the opportunities to make your own work and cultivate an audience are more widespread and diverse than ever. Read on...


Madison Tests the Field: Headshots

Hello Fellow Actors! And welcome to case one of Madison Tests the Field where we are tackling the somewhat overwhelming topic of headshots. What is a good headshot? How do you get one? How do you find a good photographer? How do you avoid breaking the bank completely? How do you get a photo that will help you book jobs without a price tag that will make you homeless? Read on...


From the Other Side of the Table: What I Learned as a Casting Assistant

After I graduated from NYU, I stumbled into a great opportunity to work for Casting Directors, Sig de Miguel and Stephen Vincent at S2 Entertainment. They’re known as the kings of indie casting in New York and have worked on such films as United 93, The Good Shepherd, Rabbit Hole and many others. During my time in their office, assisting them on a number of films they had on their plate at the time, I received an intense education about what it’s like to experience auditions on the other side of the table. In addition to some of the greatest friendships I’ve cultivated in the industry, Steve and Sig dramatically changed my understanding of what it’s like to work as a casting director and how Actors might better approach their auditioning and networking. Now I get to share some of these lessons with all of you. Read on...


Cultivating Resilience: What Military Life Taught Me About The Entertainment Industry

As Actors, I think it’s safe to say that we feel EVERYTHING. We are empathic, sensitive, deeply in tune with our emotions and comfortable with vulnerability. These are fantastic qualities and they make for some of the best acting. But it also means that when we come up against the industry side of the business, many actors give it up. And when you think about it, it makes sense. Letting the most sensitive human beings line up in a room for a person with a clipboard to evaluate their talent, tell them to lose ten pounds and basically treat them like cattle sounds like a sick cosmic joke. If you’ve chosen to be an actor, you did not take the simple path and that can mean some unpredictability. Being a military wife has taught me that when you love something and you choose a life of unpredictability for it, it will take some resilience and some sacrifice. But sacrifice, when done well, doesn’t need to be masochistic Read on...


Designing Your Own Formula for Success

Last week I wrote about some mindset tips to have when you feel like you’re starting from Square One. Whether you’re at square one or are several steps into your acting career, there’s one very important tool you need to have with you and it’s your own internal compass. Call it your gut, your intuition, your internal Jiminy Cricket, Read on...


Developing a Daily Acting Practice

To gain success in any creative field, you have to show up, every single day and do the work. This advice has been preached by our most revered acting idols and rightly so. But if you’re like many actors, your daily practice may look something like this: wake up, respond to a few emails, submit for roles on Actors Access, Mandy or Backstage, maybe touch up your website or reel, order some new headshots or rehearse some monologues and that might be about it for most days. Sound familiar? It’s extremely important to be your own manager and personal assistant, especially in the early stages of your career. But what about a daily practice of actually ACTING? Read on...


Starting Your Acting Career at Square One

When I graduated NYU I suddenly found myself in a place where many actors find themselves: entirely and utterly lost. Here I was in New York, diploma in hand, alleging that I knew something about acting, with about zero sense of direction. I had learned many important things in college, but surprisingly, nothing about how to launch an acting career (a huge oversight in the curriculum, if you ask me). Read on...